Uncategorized

Curbside Recycling is it Safe?

curb side ewasteHaving unquestionable faith in the curbside electronic pickups can be challenging. When we have spent technology that dearly needs to be recycled, reclaimed, or reused, it’s our responsibility to seek out a good recycling company who can be trusted to dispose them properly. When we place our belongings on the curb, do we know what happens to them? Will they be portioned off responsibly, or sold to the highest bidder in another country?
Often it’s hard enough to give up our technology; doing the right thing to help the environment. We do become attached to that monitor, cellphone, laptop, or tablet, and we often give them nicknames. It’s for our own good that we replace what has outlived its usefulness; however, we need to find a responsible recycler – one who is accountable for reselling the parts to the right handler once we have learned to let go.
BlueStar Recycling Company, in Hayward, CA is an experienced recycler that we can depend on for disposing of our electronics correctly. We can be assured that once the components, glass, wire, metal, and plastics have all been separated, a trusted third party may get involved in the sale of those parts to build new, current, and often cutting-edge technology that will help make our lives easier and more efficient.
Before you place your electronics on the curb, please consider a person-to-person pick up or drop-off with BlueStar Recycling Company – a responsible recycle, reuse, reclaim, and resale enterprise.

Recycling News

New record PWB prices

According to E-Scrap News The gross value of printed wiring board scrap hit yet another all-time high in April at $5.64 a pound, up 4.4 percent from March’s totals of $5.39 per pound and 29.9 percent higher than the year-over-year value of $3.95 per pound.
This data represents the full metallic values of boards over time and are not the recycling values, as those values do not include the costs involved in actually extracting metal from boards, including freight, sampling charges, assay assessments, smelting, refining, process loss, return on investment, and penalties for various elements, including beryllium, bismuth and nickel.
These values are for the estimated intrinsic metal content of recovered PC boards. Some consumers label such material as mid-value. Lower-value scrap includes monitor and television boards. Higher-value scrap includes network and video cards, and motherboards.
The average value of board scrap for the first four months of 2010 is $5.40 per pound, a 27.7 percent jump over the same period last year.